The “Instruments of Self”

Can we converse with creation? Short answer: Yes.

In this video from the June 2017 TEDx Findhorn, Michael Lindfield describes communicating with morphogenetic fields, and calls for us to recognize and develop our “Instruments of Self” so we can communicate and partner with creation to build a positive future.

Sourcing The Way has a similar intention: To develop our individual and collective instruments of self, sensitized to the subtle signals of the universe and nature, for the benefit of all. 

“The Instruments of Self,” Michael Lindfield at TEDxFindhorn

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What is a Resonance Map?

This second post in a series on Resonance Mapping, one of Sourcing the Way’s foundational tools, was co-authored by Jeff Vander Clute and Holly Thomas.

In our previous post, Sourcing flow beyond yes and no, we offered the possibility of a new paradigm for inspired decision-making that can lead to a much greater sense of flow in work and life through a process called Resonance Mapping.

To borrow a phrase, a Resonance Map is a structure for ‘making the invisible visible’ – as a high-resolution image of a particular inquiry, recorded in the form of a spreadsheet, a map, or anything in between. It’s a record of the results of Sensing and Co-sensing into constellations of opportunities by however many people are participating in the inquiry. It can represent a single point in time or show changes over time.  

A few terms and observations are important here:

  • Sensing is the individual process of opening to and receiving information from what we call Source. An active version can involve asking a question and listening with the full body system for a spontaneous, uncontrived response.
  • Co-sensing is Sensing as a group of two or more. It includes individual Sensing but can be more powerful, often producing better data for inspired decision-making.
  • Sensing and Co-sensing – broadly defined – are how we practice Sourcing, and sometimes we use the terms interchangeably. Later posts in this series go deeper into the methods and benefits of Sourcing.
  • An inquiry can be about anything. Any question you can think of is fair game, especially if you’re sincerely curious about the answer, if you’re open to being intuitively guided, and if you’re willing to follow the energy if other questions emerge from the process. For example, you might want to discern or discover:
    • The optimal location and mission for a new business, or the composition and role of a new team, including the key factors influencing those choices.
    • The well-being of body systems, from the physical to the energetic, and from the largest scale (such as the whole endocrine system) to the sub-microscopic.
    • How best to use and renew your own life energy given a wide range of possibilities and opportunities.
    • Which opportunities are the most aligned with your soul’s purpose and joy.
    • What’s happening at subtler levels of creation and consciousness.

A Resonance Map makes it possible to examine, compare, and even measure information obtained through Sensing and Co-sensing for a particular realm of inquiry. It records the information’s aliveness, degree of truth, or depth of resonance and consciousness for a given time, place, and circumstance. The sum total of the information obtained this way represents the possibilities and opportunities named in the inquiry, and those that are most alive, true, resonant, or conscious rise to the top.

When the map is set up as a spreadsheet, it’s easy to record using numbers, descriptions, or other symbols or codes, whatever each participant senses through whichever sensing methods they use, from muscle-testing or pendulum work to body sensations or meditation, and then to see the whole picture that emerges from the individual results. When the co-sensing results involve numbers, percentages, or calibrations, simple statistical tools like standard deviation can be used to gauge the coherence of the results, and of the group. Resonance Maps can also track how questions and answers evolve over time, such as before and after energetic clearings and other intentional changes.

On a more mysterious level, we’ve noticed again and again that the more curiously and gently we inquire, the more alive the inquiry itself seems to become. A creation process unfolds, with us as co-creators. As the process flows, circumstances change, and answers and choices can all shift. When we work in this way, we are working at the level of the roots of life. That’s one reason why Resonance Mapping is so powerful.

What can Resonance Mapping help us accomplish?

If we live according to the binary extremes of yes and no, we can eventually get to where our souls want to go. But the yes/no life can be like a black-and-white movie, in which it’s easy to miss the vividness of our experiences. Bouncing between the polarities of yes and no can also feel a bit like zigzagging down a cobblestone street filled with potholes we can’t see. The blockiness or bumpiness is life energy constrained by our own mental blinders – specifically, the tendency to see only the extremes – and it will often show up as drama in our life circumstances.

When we focus on the extremes, we tend to overlook the subtle pointers and directional cues that would enable us to find the path of least resistance and greatest flow, and we are likely to miss both the overall picture and the details that enrich it.

At the most basic level, Resonance Mapping removes the mental blinders. We can see and be more clearly. There is more color in our lives and the path becomes smoother.

The most tangible and immediate benefit of Resonance Mapping is that it brings clarity and inspiration to decision-making by asking what wants attention right now, and then mapping the ‘aliveness and consciousness’ of a whole range of opportunities, not just the leading candidates. This produces a higher-resolution picture of how resonant (alive) each possibility is in relation to the whole. What emerges is a clear sense of the most luminous and empowered path forward. In the process, the way to go often becomes completely obvious.

Plumeria combined
Pixelated vs. high-res image of plumeria blossoms

When the resolution of the picture increases, the blockiness of the pixelation disappears and previously invisible subtleties, layers, and interrelationships emerge. We move into clarity and engage with a much more accurate representation of the situation, which in turn empowers us to navigate life that much more skillfully. Our inquiries and decision-making evolve from some version of “Is that blur ahead of me a friend or a foe?” to something more like “What is the pattern? What is the gift of this turn in the story? What am I being invited to notice and shift?”

As a tool, we can apply Resonance Mapping in other ways as well. For instance, we may use it as a feedback system to map the aliveness of various qualities of being that we are cultivating or liberating. We have found that working with real-time Sensing and Co-sensing feedback helps enormously in amplifying the ‘positive’ qualities and clearing the ‘negative’ qualities for ourselves, our organizations, and our communities.

Beyond the Beyond

Over the last six years at Sourcing The Way, Resonance Mapping has evolved from a basic ranking system into a mathematically and spiritually subtle architecture for conversing with Creation and Consciousness. Every time we’ve thought the system was complete, another layer has revealed itself, as if responding to our invitation to show up even more fully and deeply. More than a tool for practical decision-making, it has become a consciousness technology that can sharpen our insight, expand our awareness, increase our sensitivity to subtle energies, and, with consistent practice, open us to non-local awareness and Self-realization.

The more we source and map via Sensing and Co-sensing, the more we discover that immanent quality of ourselves that is the Source of all we know and experience. The ‘resolution’ keeps increasing, and the ‘pictures of reality’ we’ve seen emerge so far are stunning. The Infinite keeps unfolding, helping us awaken to the vastness and offering practical support for living more purposefully and authentically.

In the next post of this series, we will offer several real-world examples of Resonance Mapping.

Sourcing Flow Beyond Yes and No with Resonance Mapping

This post is the first in a series about Resonance Mapping, one of Sourcing the Way’s foundational tools, and was co-authored by Jeff Vander Clute and Holly L. Thomas.

When we face important decisions, all the information in the world is useless if we can’t discern which options work toward our goal, which options don’t, and whether the goal itself is optimal. Fortunately, we all have access to radically powerful inner wisdom technologies that can help illuminate the essential decisions of our lives, and we can cultivate the capacity to listen to these parts of ourselves in ways that will lead us to a greater sense of ease, freedom, and empowerment.

Hunches, intuitions, gut feelings, and synchronicities can help us navigate the day-to-day world of opportunities and challenges, as well as the inner landscape of ideas and emotions. Everyday techniques for dialoguing with intuitive guidance, such as muscle testing and body sensing, can yield yes/no/maybe answers as well as quantitative information. For more nuanced inquiries, we might pray, meditate, dive into research, consult experts or intuitives, explore dreamwork, check energies, ask trusted friends, watch for synchronicities, and so on.

Sometimes these “messages” come through loud and clear, and our inner compass is strong enough to follow. Often, however, whatever sense we have of being guided isn’t persistent or consistent enough to count on. The good news is that with practice, that can change. 

Working with inner guidance or universal intelligence is like building up a muscle that needs to be strengthened and exercised to function well. As with learning to walk, we begin with the “muscles” and modest (yet miraculous) coordination gained from earlier stages, take awkward first steps, fall down, and keep trying…until freedom comes.

One wrinkle in the process is our tendency to seek information through yes-or-no questions. Such an approach highlights binary or absolute black-and-white distinctions, which are actually rare.

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I’ll meet you there. When the soul lies down in that grass the world is too full to talk about.
– from Coleman Barks’ translation of Maulana Jalal Al-Din Rumi

Another wrinkle is that the linear approach of pursuing a series of questions toward a single conclusion ignores the nonlinear interdependencies among the myriad woven strands of our lives. Pulling on one strand, by making a decision to do or not do something, may strengthen some strands while unraveling others in a way that’s largely unpredictable.

That’s not to say we should never make choices. The key is to understand that single-minded linear sequences of questions can take us only so far. And, with a deeper understanding of Reality, we come to discover that they simply don’t work if we wish to live the dynamic fluidity of existence in a state of grace and awakeness.

If we look very, very closely, even “answers” that we call “yes” and “no” are almost always maybes – ever-so-slightly off-yes or off-no. Life exists in the creative space of “almost” and “maybe,” in other words, potential. The potential for our lives to flow gracefully exists between the extremes. The experience of flow is in many respects the opposite of our usual fixation on yes and no.

ball-443853_1280
Photo by geralt, Pixabay.com

The field of fluid dynamics shows us that flow, in nature, is also extremely nonlinear. If we look long and deeply enough, it becomes clear that the way in which we’ve trained ourselves to perceive the world and make decisions is why our lives tend to be filled with stops and starts, bumps and blocks in the road, and setbacks and disappointments. Taking into account how Reality actually works as a basis for much more empowered decision-making for living in flow, is where Resonance Mapping comes in.

Resonance Mapping zeroes in on subtle differences that can have profound effects, to help us find our flow and create what’s truly optimal. It engages with the full spectrum of vibrational consciousness (and beyond), by mapping the space of ‘maybes’ in a useful way. It unites the left brain with the right brain – analysis with intuition – so we show up more fully and bring all of our wisdom and ways of knowing to our decision-making. The rest of this series will focus on the what and how of Resonance Mapping.

Love says ‘I am everything.’ Wisdom says ‘I am nothing.’ Between the two, my life flows. – Nisargadatta Maharaj, I Am That

Identifying Our Soul’s Values – How Do We Actually Do It? (part 2)

4 Steps to defining and connecting with your Soul’s Values

© 2016 Anna Maria Bäck & Sourcing The Way

A quick re-cap from part 1 of this blogpost:

We’re all leaders, regardless of position, life style, or creed. For me, leadership is closely linked to my values and to questions like “Am I the best I can be? Am I taking responsibility for my actions and reactions?”

It’s difficult to answer such questions without knowing what our values or guiding principles are. For the most part, we seem to use values to distinguish between “us” and “them”, or what is considered “good” or “bad”. We’re also used to talking about “moral values” and “ethical values”, but how often are we encouraged to explore our soul’s values?

The cool thing about our soul’s values is that they connect us to something deeper, something bigger than ourselves, and they help us align with actions and expressions that bring meaning and fulfilment to our lives.

Sticking to your Soul’s Values promotes and supports your personal and professional growth. It increases your experience of clarity and sense of freedom and possibility in your work and life.

As a result you will:

  • Feel empowered to up-level your service and contribution in the world, leading you to new beginnings and empowered self-leadership.
  • Experience peace of mind, while being aware that we create our own realities with our thoughts, beliefs and actions.
  • Manifest inner balance and harmony.
  • Build confidence in your innate worth and abilities.
So, what are the steps – how do we actually do it?

Continue reading Identifying Our Soul’s Values – How Do We Actually Do It? (part 2)

Being of Service to Your Soul’s Values – A Tool for Inner Transformation (part 1)

 

Living Your Soul’s Values – A Novel Concept?
    – How to define, connect with, and live one’s values

© 2016 Anna Maria Bäck & Sourcing The Way

 

Leadership is a verb, not a job.

Chris Clark

 

We’re all leaders, regardless of position, life style, or creed. Thinking that we don’t matter, or that our actions or reactions don’t matter, is not only irresponsible, but also a testament to a deep feeling of separation. For me, leadership is closely linked to my values and to questions like “Am I the best I can be? Am I taking responsibility for my actions and reactions?”

It’s difficult to answer such questions without knowing what our values or guiding principles are. We usually enter the conversation about values through one of two doorways. For the most part, we seem to use values to distinguish between “us” and “them”, or what is considered “good” or “bad”. We’re also used to talking about “moral values” and “ethical values”. Both approaches speak to human behavior, but there’s a third doorway – to knowingly embody and consciously live our values. In other words, to ask “Am I “being” my values? Am I being true to them for myself?”

The true test of a man’s character is what he does when no one is watching.

John Wooden

To ground and integrate the values we aim to live by, the natural first step is to identify and define our soul’s values — our foundation. But identifying and defining values isn’t enough. For me, it has been equally crucial to connect with my soul’s values – by bringing them into my body and mind, and stay connected to them in my everyday life.

It’s easy to get lost in abstract thinking when talking about values. For a more practical approach I like Jaemin Frazer’s descriptions of the “Be-Do-Have” model and three common approaches to trying to get ahead in life, “The Victim”, “The Worker”, and “The Winner”, excerpted here:

Continue reading Being of Service to Your Soul’s Values – A Tool for Inner Transformation (part 1)

Challenging the Ego – Is it worth it?

With everything that is up in this world currently – the US election circus, the roaring patriarchy, the rise of the feminine in both men and women, our disregard for mother Nature, the arising call for people’s equal inherent value, to name a few – I feel called to write this post.

So, why the question, “Challenging the ego – is it worth it?”.

In spiritual circles it is sometimes said that we need to conquer the ego. That the ego is bad, that it is only out to serve and protect itself and its interests. I take a step back and compare this with what is going on in our human collective psyche – the seeming opposing forces calling for, on the one side, the individual’s right to choose and be in charge of his/her own life, where there is a belief that the success and therefore right of an individual has precedence above everything else, and on the other side, the call for a more humane attitude as there is an awareness that we are all connected, where looking out for one another will inherently mean that we are also looking out for ourselves, where there is a belief that it is possible to thrive by supporting one another.

For the past 10 years I have challenged my ego to own up to its ways while following an unseen trajectory. It has been a fascinating journey which has involved a lot of dedication, will, and a deep desire for evolution.

When I look up the meaning of ego I find: “A person’s sense of self-esteem or self-importance”. In psychoanalysis it refers to “the part of the mind that mediates between the conscious and the unconscious and is responsible for reality testing and a sense of personal identity.” In philosophy (in metaphysics) it refers to “a conscious thinking subject“. And from the Cambridge Dictionary: “your idea or opinion of yourself, especially your feeling of your own importance and ability”.

What I have found is that I have a choice. In my own experience I have learned that my views, beliefs, judgments about the world coming from my ego, can be either very limiting or very open and expansive. That my attitude creates a frame for how I perceive the world around me and my own life experience.


Early on it became clear that the structure I had created as a result of upbringing, social circle, and personal experiences was a tightly fitted suit that did a good job at keeping things in place, but was, however, equally limiting my ability to move and gain an expanded view of life and the world we live in.

On November 6th, 2006 I asked a similar question in my then blog, “Little Green Men and Tall Angelic Beings”. I wasn’t aware then that what I was challenging was the ego, my own as well as other people’s. I blush when I think that my voice from 10 years ago will be shared here as a raw expression of innocent curiosity and in part a hurt ego. I smile as I read this early contribution to the written word. It isn’t a poetic and eloquent expression, but a heartfelt sentiment to the experience of deviating from the norm, from spilling over other people’s measuring cups:

Is it worth it?

Standing out or being different is not easy. At the beginning I had to defend myself all the time, explaining to people why I would want to move abroad again… “Hadn’t I already been there and done that?” I tried to explain that it isn’t about what I do, it’s who I am.

My mother had said to me that I’d always been extremely curious and always had the need for change and learning new things. As if moving abroad was not enough, I know some of my friends lifted an eyebrow (some of them two) when I told them about my quest for spirituality.

Why is it that people automatically judge in a negative way when something different is on the horizon? Why is it so difficult for some people to sit back and just listen, take it all in, and then give their verdict? Many times I have had to fight verdicts based more on the other person’s fear of the unknown than on the actual facts. I think it is rude to slag someone off without knowing all the facts. The world would be a better place if humanity would focus on the good instead of the bad.

So, is it worth it? Hell, YES! I wouldn’t want it any other way. I have learned so much about myself as well as about other people. And I have become a better person as a result of it.

It is worth being different. Believe in yourself!

Many rivers have floated under lots of bridges since that post… In my “quest for spirituality”, I have made it central in my life to practice forgiveness and gratitude. I understand that one aspect of who we are is the sum of our experiences, and, based on our individual lens, all of us do the best we can with what we perceive that we’ve got. This isn’t a justification for awkward behaviour or action/reaction, just an expanded perspective as we all have “our own perceived truth”.

A few key learnings from the past 10 years:

  • Everybody needs to feel seen and heard
  • Everybody does the best they can with what they’ve got
  • We are always part of someone else’s experience
  • Our ego wants us to be safe
  • We can never fall off our path

I’ll end this post with my very first blog post ever, as the questions I posed then are still very much present and “up” in the collective:

Why is it…

30/10/2006  

Why is it…
…that most people are afraid, and feel the need to only believe that which they can see, hear or touch? …that most people don’t ever stop for a moment to live in ‘the now’? …that we are terrified of finding proof that we are not alone?

What would be so terrible…
…if we were to find that we are getting help with the big as well as the little things in life? …if humanity started to believe in a higher power? …if we were to accept that the universe is there for us and all we have to do is ask? …if we were to start to think about the person behind the mask we rush past in the street? …if we started focusing on what we have instead of mucking about focusing on what we don’t have?
 

Although the above wasn’t originally written with the ego in mind, I can’t help notice how the questions do their bit to keep the challenge alive.

Group Gnosis and Governance

After a powerful first day at the September 2015 InClaritas retreat in Seattle, the following visual came to me as a way of understanding the essence of both InClaritas and Sourcing the Way (the strategic consulting company co-founded by Maria Bäck and myself).

Group Gnosis & Governance 20160107

In a flash I saw that group processes and deliberations, especially in matters of governance, typically involve a considerable amount of people “bumping up against” one another, on multiple levels. At the same time, I saw that much of this friction and conflict could be eliminated through awareness cultivation practices, and furthermore that doing so would unlock a group’s potential for collective flow and even genius.

Continue reading Group Gnosis and Governance